Notes Installing ChromeFlex

If you have never heard of ChromeFlex it is a way to turn that older
desktop or laptop into a working ChromeBook.

This is now easier to do as Google acquired a company who was doing this
on their own.

This will give a new life to that older desktop or laptop and in a way
that is secure & easy to use.

Once you have it fully installed, when you power on that desktop or
laptop, you will have a fully working Chromebook, & none of this setup
stuff to deal with.




Recently a new version of ChromeFlex was made available. I tried the
version that was released earlier this year, but as that was more of a
preview and bugs were not worked out yet, I didn't get very far into
installing it.

I decided to give it another try with the new version that is supposed
to work with a wider variety of hardware. Most people will be using
ChromeFlex on older desktops & laptops anyway.


Just to check, I ran the install in a test it out mode and it didn't
work with a new Wifi 6 card on a new computer I just got within the past
two weeks. It does work on two older desktops though.



This is more of a collection of notes on what I used and how I did
things instead of a step by step tutorial.

The suggested method of creating the bootable media is to use an add-on
in the Chrome Browser. That is very difficult to do if you are blind and
using a screen reader, such as NVDA. So I found another method of doing
the same thing. I found a place to download the current file for
ChromeFlex and the site I went to suggested the same tool to put the
file onto a USB drive that I was going to use. I just prefer the
Portable Apps version of Rufus instead of the one on that site.


Here is where I went to download the image file.

https://quickfever.com/chrome-os-flex/


Here is where you can download Rufus from PortableApps.

https://portableapps.com/apps/utilities/rufus-portable


Once you have the image on the USB Drive, you'll need to boot from that
drive to start ChromeFlex.

One way to do that is in the run dialog on windows enter

shutdown /r /o


If that works on your computer, it will restart to a screen where you
can use Narrator with control windows enter and navigate to boot from a
device.

If that command doesn't work you might need help booting from the USB
Drive that has ChromeFlex.


As ChromeFlex is booting up it will speak to press the space bar if you
want to use the screen reader. Otherwise you could use the ChromeVox
shortcut of control alt z to toggle it on or off.




It would be much more work to create a complete tutorial to walk someone
through this as it is based on a variety of things that may not be
considered common skills, such as downloading the correct image file,
using Rufus, & booting the computer from the drive.



If you are one who needs more help than I can provide in these notes, I
encourage you to find someone to help. There are great benefits to using
a ChromeBook. Other than being accessible in many ways, its a free way,
except for the older hardware of course, to get a ChromeBook.

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